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Living off your creativity – A Discussion

“Eliminate the word fail”, says Isabelle White, founder of women’s jewellery brand Image Gang and men’s jewellery brand Club-row when talking on a panel of four at a talk, Living off your creativity held in Peckham early this month.

 Creatives are constantly doubting themselves and their ability to excel within their craft.

A reported 55% of the London’s workforce have the desire to change career and a whopping 54% of Millennials would like to change career within the next 2 years reported by Dr. Steve Priddy, Director of Research and Academic Dean at London School of Business and Finance.  So, what is the root cause of London’s appalling job dissatisfaction coming from?

Image: 1, Taken from research conducted by Dr. Steve Priddy, Director of Research and Academic Dean at London School of Business and Finance.

Image: 1, Taken from research conducted by Dr. Steve Priddy, Director of Research and Academic Dean at London School of Business and Finance.

Frankly, a lot of people aren’t doing what they love.

 Better work-life balance, improved job satisfaction and pay are only the few of the reasons behind these disappointing figures. One key point for aspiring creatives is the belief that they are unable to break away from temporary 9-5 jobs, worked in order to “fill in the gap” and have financial stability, with hopes for a big break in their creative craft.

 After attending the talk in Peckham, a clear understanding was made of the reasons behind the fear of breaking away from these temporary jobs.

 People living in London are experiencing financial distress, especially with worries of what the future holds in regards to our economy. A lot of this is fuelled by the UK’s decision to leave the EU. Uncertainty with our economy lead people to think finance first. Playing it “safe”, and opting for a job you don’t actually enjoy may seem like the more stable option. However, the panel taught the audience to take the plunge and believe in your craft giving advice on how to make it.

 Nail artist Jessica Thompson, who began her career as a nail artist working at a popular nail salon Wah Nails in Dalston, explains to the audience that in order to excel in your craft you must recognise and take every opportunity. If you feel as though there isn’t enough coming your way… create them. Jessica started doing nails for free just to get her work out there.

 Can’t pay for promotion? Create your own says Jessica. Doing clients nails for free gained Jessica the exposure she needed to go on to working for brands such as, Moschino and Sophia Webster.

 Use social media platforms as a public portfolio. There is no harm in showing your followers what work you are capable of producing. You may use it to gain potential customers but also find like-minded people who are interested in collaborating. The panel also expressed the importance of collaborating, as this gives your brand a chance to not only broaden your brands market but also grow contacts and network within your particular faculty which can lead you to a grow outside of social media platforms. Who knows, Instagram could be your new Tinder, but for wavy collabs with other aspiring creatives? Possibly even established brands.

 Jessica has also explained how she sets two daily goals before bed in order to have a productive morning the next day which makes her feel accomplished once completing them. Take notes, it’s worth a try!

Image: 2, Taken by Hypemari for his homecoming series focusing on a combination of British and Caribbean imagery.(https://www.hypemari.com).

Image: 2, Taken by Hypemari for his homecoming series focusing on a combination of British and Caribbean imagery.(https://www.hypemari.com).

London-based street photographer Hypemari has many notable achievements. His work has been published by publications like Dazed, ID and F Word magazine. He explains his inspiration and motivation to succeed stemmed from seeing people around him going through struggles. Using what is around you seems to be a valuable resource to Hypemari and Lewis Palmer, owner of Palmer Pouch, whether this be negative or positive.

 Palmer Pouch – a London based utility workwear brand, Lewis Palmer says “hard work makes great people”. When working in fashion, Lewis acknowledges the difficulty working in such a fast-paced industry. Like many others, Lewis Palmer started with a passion and explains that he used what was around him in order to become successful within his craft. Impressively, Lewis works mostly on his own to produce his pouches and other fashion accessories. 

 The panel all agree that figuring out your niche is one of the most important things for starting up your brand. If you are a start-up brand, consider what makes you different, what your unique selling point is and to be confident with it. Create your own elevator pitch. Being able to convey your brand in a few words could get you a long way.

 Your 9-5 job just isn’t cutting it? Doubt can come from being apprehensive about possible obstacles and that’s okay. The panel were asked by a member of the audience what they do when they face set-backs. Isabelle White explains that they are only set-backs if you let them be, learning and taking the best from those experiences is the most important thing.

 An option of failure is no option at all to the members of the panel. An admirable and incredible work ethic is strong between the four and nothing is to stop you from achieving too. Taking risks and believing could reduce a national issue regarding to job satisfaction. If you aren’t happy doing your 9-5,  be assured, there is always a way out.

Written by Tamay Aldemir

 Pages:

Isabelle White:
https://www.imagegang.co.uk & https://www.club-row.co.uk

 Jessica Thompson:
https://www.glossin-nails.co.uk

 Hypemari:
http://www.hypemari.com

 Lewis Palmer:
https://palmerpouch.com

Mia Giacone